Nepal Ranks 124th among 133 countries in Net Readiness

Nepal’s ranking on Network Readiness Index (NRI) slightly improved to 124th in 2009-2010 compared to 124th in 2008-2009 among 133 countries primarily due to individual efforts, says the report, entitled “The Global Information Technology Report 2009–2010– ICT for Sustainability” produced by the World Economic Forum of Davos, in cooperation with INSEAD, a world business school.

Nepal Net Readiness: Notable Individual Efforts

Nepal Monitor, 27 March 2010

Nepal’s ranking on Network Readiness Index (NRI) slightly improves. Individual efforts to be credited.

Nepal’s ranking on the Networked Readiness Index 2009–2010 has improved slightly, by around 3 points as compared to last year. It ranks 124th among 133 countries. In 2008-2009, Nepal’s ranking was 127 out of 134 countries.

The report, entitled “The Global Information Technology Report 2009–2010– ICT for Sustainability” is produced by the World Economic Forum of Davos, in cooperation with INSEAD, a world business school. The 448-page report, co-edited by Soumitra Dutta, INSEAD and Irene Mia, World Economic Forum, provides indicators on various aspects of ICT and related developments in 133 countries in the world.

Published annually since 2001 and the ninth in the series, the report features the latest results of the NRI, offering a snapshot of the state of networked readiness in the world.

The Networked Readiness Index (NRI), featured in the report, examines how prepared countries are to use ICT effectively on three dimensions: the general business, regulatory and infrastructure environment for ICT; the readiness of the three key stakeholder groups in a society individuals, businesses and governments to use and benefit from ICT; and the actual usage of the latest information and communication technologies available.

Nepal is placed under the group comprising 23 low income (LO) countries and it ranks 21 among them in the NRI. The LO group is led by Vietnam, followed by Senegal, the Gambia, Kenya, Mali, Zambia, Ghana, Mauritania, Burkina Faso, Tajikistan, Benin, Uganda, Mozambique, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Malawi, Tanzania, Madagascar, Ethiopia, Kyrgyz Republic, Nepal, Burundi, Zimbabwe, and Chad.

Nepal has been included in the Networked Readiness Index since 2006-2007, when it ranked 108th out of 122 countries. In 2007-2008, its ranking was 119 out of 127 countries. In 2008–2009 Nepal’s ranking was 127 out of 134 countries.

Five among eight South Asian countries are included in the Index. India is placed 43, Sri Lanka 72, Pakistan 87, Bangladesh 118 and Nepal 124.

Globally, Sweden tops this year’s rankings followed by Singapore and Denmark, which was in the number one position for the last three years. Switzerland (4), the United States (5) and the other Nordic countries together with the Canada, Hong Kong and the Netherlands complete the top 10. (Here’s the Global Highlights)

The bottom five countries are Chad, Zimbabwe, Bolivia, Timore-Leste and Burundi.

The higher income (HI) group is led by Sweden, followed by Singapore, Denmark, Switzerland, United States, Finland, Canada, Hong Kong SAR, Netherlands, Norway, Taiwan, China, Iceland, United Kingdom, Germany, Korea, Rep., Australia, Luxembourg, France, New Zealand, Austria, Japan, Belgium, United Arab Emirates, Ireland, Estonia, Malta, Israel Bahrain, Qatar, Slovenia, Cyprus, Portugal Spain, Barbados, Czech Republic, Saudi Arabia, Puerto Rico, Hungary, Italy, Oman, Croatia, Slovak Republic, Greece, Brunei Darussalam

The upper-middle income (UM) is led by Malaysia, Chile, Lithuania, Montenegro, Thailand, Costa Rica, Latvia, Mauritius, Uruguay, Panama, Romania, Colombia, Brazil, South Africa, Poland, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Turkey, Bulgaria, Macedonia, FYR, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Russian Federation, Botswana, Namibia, Argentina, Peru, Libya, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Venezuela, Algeria, Suriname,

The first among the lower middle income (LM) is China. Others in the group in order of rank are Tunisia, Chile, Lithuania, India, Jordan, Thailand, Azerbaijan, Indonesia, Egypt, Sri Lanka, El Salvador, Ukraine, Guatemala, Philippines, Pakistan, Morocco, Georgia, Mongolia, Albania, Nigeria, Guyana, Armenia, Côte d’Ivoire, Syria, Honduras, Lesotho, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Cameroon, Timor-Leste, and Bolivia.

WEF used the classification of countries by the World Bank (December 2009) based on GNI (US$) per capita to categorize the four income groups. Low-income (LO) countries (under US$976), lower-middle income (LM) countries (between US$976 and 3,855), upper-middle income (UM) countries (between US$3,856 and 11,905), and high income (HI) countries (above US$11,905).

The Report is composed of four thematic parts. Part 1 features the findings of the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) for 2009-10, together with selected essays examining different topics related to ICT and sustainability in its economic, environmental, and social dimensions.

Part 2 provides insight into best practices and policies in networked readiness and competitiveness, focusing on specific country case studies.The countries selected this year are Spain, Ireland,Tunisia, and China, which all have adopted interesting examples of successful ICT strategies to foster national economic growth and development.

Part 3 features detailed profiles for the 133 economies covered in this year’s Report, offering a detailed assessment of each economy’s current networked readiness landscape and allowing for international and historical comparisons on specific variables or components of the NRI.

Part 4 includes data tables for each of the 68 variables composing the NRI this year, with rankings for the economies covered, as well as technical notes nd sources that provide comprehensive information on hard data variables.

Under the main theme of ICT for sustainability, the Report explores the central role of ICT in fostering economic, environmental, and social sustainability both as an industry in itself and in the overall economy and society.

Robert Greenhill, the chief business officer of WEF writes in the preface that if ICT plays a central role in ensuring economic sustainability, it can and must play an equally central role in promoting environmental and social sustainability, both as an industry and as a key element of enabling infra- structure. He adds: “We believe sustainability, in all its components, should be a priority for policymakers, businesses, and civil society alike to foster a more just, more inclusive and crisis-resilient world. ICT and the ICT industry must now rise to the challenge.”

The report gives credit to the role of ICT for helping in the sustainiblity of economic, environemental and social amid the ongoing finacial crisis.

In Nepal, the report sees a better market environment (108) than the governemnt environment (115). The best scores for Nepal are given to indivisual efforts (55).

Nepal’s key indicators on the NRI do not look impressive, although the “readiness component” scores better (107) compared with the other two main components—environment (123) and usage (129).

Nepal also lags in the research front. It is 127th in company standing on research and development as well as on university-industry collaboration in R&D.

Nepal Key indicators
Population (millions), 2008………………………………………………….28.6
GDP per capita (PPP $), 2008 …………………………………………..1,144
Mobile phone subscriptions per 100 population, 2008……….14.6
Internet users per 100 population, 2008 ………………………………1.7
Internet bandwidth (Mb/s) per 10,000 population, 2007……….0.0
Utility patents per million population, 2008 ………………………….0.0

Networked Readiness Index
Edition (number of economies) Rank
2009–2010 (133) ………………………………………….124
2008–2009 (134) ………………………………………….127
2007–2008 (127) ………………………………………….119
Global Competitiveness Index 2009–2010 (133) 125

Environment component 123
Market environment 108
1.01 Venture capital availability…………………………………….93
1.02 Financial market sophistication …………………………………114
1.03 Availability of latest technologies ……………………………..128
1.04 State of cluster development…………………………………….94
1.05 Burden of government regulation …………………………………92
1.06 Extent and effect of taxation……………………………………58
1.07 Total tax rate, 2008*…………………………………………..58
1.08 Time required to start a business, 2009*……………………..90
1.09 No. of procedures required to start a business, 2009* ….55
1.10 Intensity of local competition ……………………………………110
1.11 Freedom of the press………………………………………………..85

Political and regulatory environment 115
2.01 Effectiveness of law-making bodies…………………………..107
2.02 Laws relating to ICT ………………………………………124
2.03 Judicial independence ……………………………………..87
2.04 Intellectual property protection ……………………………111
2.05 Efficiency of legal framework in settling disputes ……….120
2.06 Efficiency of legal framework in challenging regs………..117
2.07 Property rights ………………………………………119
2.08 No. of procedures to enforce a contract, 2009*……………80
2.09 Time to enforce a contract, 2009* …………………………….102
2.10 Level of competition index, 2007*………………………………82

Infrastructure environment 130
3.01 Number of telephone lines, 2008*…………………………….109
3.02 Secure Internet servers, 2008*…………………………………105
3.03 Electricity production, 2006*…………………………………….120
3.04 Availability of scientists and engineers……………………….121
3.05 Quality of scientific research institutions ……………………127
3.06 Tertiary education enrollment, 2007*…………………………102
3.07 Education expenditure, 2007*…………………………………..115
3.08 Accessibility of digital content…………………………………..124
3.09 Internet bandwidth, 2007* ……………………………………….122

Readiness component 107
Individual readiness 55
4.01 Quality of math and science education ………………………105
4.02 Quality of the educational system……………………………..110
4.03 Buyer sophistication ………………………………………..115
4.04 Residential telephone connection charge, 2008* ………….47
4.05 Residential monthly telephone subscription, 2008* ………36
4.06 Fixed broadband tariffs, 2008*……………………………………80
4.07 Mobile cellular tariffs, 2008*………………………………………14
4.08 Fixed telephone lines tariffs, 2008* …………………………….24

Government readiness 123
6.01 Government prioritization of ICT ……………………………….119
6.02 Gov’t procurement of advanced tech. products…………..126
6.03 Importance of ICT to gov’t vision of the future……………123

Usage component 129
Individual usage 125
7.01 Mobile telephone subscriptions, 2008* ……………………..127
7.02 Personal computers, 2005* ……………………………………..122
7.03 Broadband Internet subscribers, 2008* ……………………..116
7.04 Internet users, 2008* ………………………………………………122
7.05 Internet access in schools………………………………………..104

Business usage 121
8.01 Prevalence of foreign technology licensing…………………123
8.02 Firm-level technology absorption ………………………………129
8.03 Capacity for innovation …………………………………………….126
8.04 Extent of business Internet use ………………………………..125
8.05 Creative industries exports, 2003*………………………………65
8.06 Utility patents, 2008* ………………………………………………..90
8.07 High-tech exports* …………………………………………………..n/a

Government usage 124
9.01 Government success in ICT promotion………………………119
9.02 Government Online Service Index, 2009* ………………….108
9.03 ICT use and government efficiency …………………………..121
9.04 Presence of ICT in government agencies …………………..129
9.05 E-Participation Index, 2009*……………………………………..104

Read the full report here.

Posted by Editor on March 27, 2010 01:13 PM

Source: Nepal Monitor

 

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